Living with sight loss latest news

Uber launches UberASSIST

Content
Image: 
This image has no alternative text.
Content: 

During April 2017 Uber announced the launch of UberASSIST in Cape Town. Uber has now announced the launch of UberASSIST in Johannesburg!

UberASSIST has been designed to provide additional assistance for senior riders and riders with access needs. According to Uber, Driver-partners are specifically trained to assist riders when getting in and ou of vehicles and can accommodate folding wheelchairs, walkers and service animals.

Read more about accessing this service here: http://tinyurl.com/y82ebokx

Location: 
Johannesburg
South Africa
Categories
Category: 
Living with sight loss latest news
Audience group: 
Supporters
Professionals
Press
Parents
Members
Low or lost vision
Job seekers
Display
rotation: 
Remove from Home page rotation block
front page: 
Display on Home page article blocks
Section pages: 
Remove from featured articles
what can you do: 
Remove from "What you can do" list
other media: 
Remove from "Other media" list

High hopes for Marrakesh

Content
Image: 
A photo of two learners with a Perkins brailler
Content: 

In case you haven’t heard, the Marrakesh Treaty came into force on 30 September 2016. It seeks to boost the volume of texts for blind and print disabled people around the world. This is vital, because currently only about 10% of published materials are available in accessible formats, such as Braille, large print and audio.


Hanif Kruger, SANCB’s Resource Centre Manager, is excited about this. “There is a worldwide book famine for blind or print disabled people. The Marrakesh Treaty aims to alleviate this shortage of material. I’m also looking at our government to clean up the Copyright Act so that we can provide education and opportunities to all people who are deserving of it.”
 

Location: 
Pretoria
South Africa
Categories
Category: 
Support us success stories
Living with sight loss latest news
Landing page
About us success stories
Audience group: 
Supporters
Members
Low or lost vision
Display
rotation: 
Remove from Home page rotation block
front page: 
Remove from Home page article blocks
Section pages: 
Add to featured articles
what can you do: 
Remove from "What you can do" list
other media: 
Remove from "Other media" list

A long road to diagnosis

Content
Image: 
This image has no alternative text.
Content: 

Eleven-year-old Anthony has struggled with vision difficulties his whole life. As an infant, he was diagnosed with Nystagmus, an involuntary movement of the eyes. In 2012, he was finally diagnosed with Ocular Albinism, meaning he has almost no melanin in his eyes to filter light. This leaves him basically blind in bright sunlight, even when he’s wearing his photochromic glasses.

Anthony has been fortunate to have teachers who go the extra mile for him, enabling him to stay in mainstream schools. His teachers learned that small changes could have a big impact on his learning, like using darker pencils and seating him at the front of the class. With the help of our donors, it’s hoped that our school screening project will help us to identify more children with visual difficulties, so that they too can benefit from early intervention.

Categories
Category: 
Living with sight loss latest news
Landing page
Display
rotation: 
Remove from Home page rotation block
front page: 
Display on Home page article blocks
Section pages: 
Remove from featured articles
what can you do: 
Remove from "What you can do" list
other media: 
Remove from "Other media" list

Burning a candle for blindness

Content
Image: 
vigil
Content: 

The South African National Council for the Blind hosted a candlelight vigil to commemorate International World Sight Day on 8 October 2015 to highlight the plight of people living with curable blindness.

For over 60 years, our Bureau for the Prevention of Blindness has provided mobile services to communities across South Africa, offering ongoing cataract blitzes, eye screening and the provision of ready-made affordable spectacles, among other services.

It’s part of our commitment to end avoidable blindness by 2020 – a huge undertaking considering that about 80% of blindness is avoidable.

To  make a donation now, click here

Location: 
South Africa
Categories
Category: 
Living with sight loss latest news
Audience group: 
Supporters
Professionals
Press
Parents
Members
Low or lost vision
Display
rotation: 
Remove from Home page rotation block
front page: 
Remove from Home page article blocks
Section pages: 
Add to featured articles
what can you do: 
Remove from "What you can do" list
other media: 
Remove from "Other media" list

Take special care when you see a white cane

Content
Image: 
White Cane Safety Day
Content: 

The white cane has come a long way!

It’s no longer just a device that helps a blind person safely navigate their surroundings, but is a symbol of their independence and ability to come and go as they please. That’s why we always celebrate International White Cane Safety Day in October with a series of national and provincial walks.

Lafarge is our long-time partner in our national walk, which was held in Bloemfontein.

In the Western Cape, St Dunstan’s Association for South African War-Blinded Veterans hosted their Long Cane Rally in Green Point. The SANCB hosted its first rally in Mafikeng, sponsored by the North West Department of Health – whose staff went the extra mile by walking blindfolded.

Let’s hope that this growing event helps create greater awareness about the challenges of travelling alone with a white cane, and encourages motorists to take special care when they see people using a white cane.

To renew your support and make a donation now, click here

 

Location: 
South Africa
Categories
Category: 
Living with sight loss latest news
Assistive devices and technology
Audience group: 
Supporters
Professionals
Press
Parents
Members
Low or lost vision
Display
rotation: 
Remove from Home page rotation block
front page: 
Remove from Home page article blocks
Section pages: 
Add to featured articles
what can you do: 
Remove from "What you can do" list
other media: 
Remove from "Other media" list

Website for Students

Content
Image: 
Picture of a computer with a worldmap on the screen
Content: 

The We Connect Now website was created in April 2008 as a virtual community for students with disabilities. To visit the website, please click on the following link: http://weconnectnow.wordpress.com

Location: 
Pretoria,
South Africa
Categories
Category: 
Living with sight loss latest news
Audience group: 
Parents
Members
Low or lost vision
Job seekers
Display
rotation: 
Remove from Home page rotation block
front page: 
Remove from Home page article blocks
Section pages: 
Add to featured articles
what can you do: 
Remove from "What you can do" list
other media: 
Add to "Other media" list

Web Content Accessibility Guidelines

Content
Image: 
Photo of a blind man using a computer
Content: 

Below is a World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) press release of 15 October 2012

W3C Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0 Approved as ISO/IEC International Standard


Translations | W3C Press Release Archive


15 October 2012 — Today the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Joint Technical Committee JTC 1, Information Technology of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), announced approval of the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 as an ISO/IEC International Standard (ISO/IEC 40500:2012).


"This important accessibility standard, which is already widely deployed internationally, can now benefit from additional formal recognition from ISO/IEC national bodies," noted Jeff Jaffe, W3C CEO. "Such recognition is expected to increase internationally harmonized uptake of WCAG 2.0 by governments, business, and the broader Web community."


"ISO/IEC JTC 1 is very pleased to bring on board this most important of W3C accessibility standards, given the increased interest in accessibility among JTC 1 National Bodies in recent years," said Karen Higginbottom, Chair of ISO/IEC JTC 1. "We also expect that ISO/IEC recognition will encourage greater convergence around WCAG 2.0, further driving development of supporting tools and software."


International harmonization of accessibility standards benefits all


WCAG 2.0 has been adopted or referenced by many governments and organizations. Following the passage of the United Nations Convention on Rights of Persons with Disabilities, an increasing number of countries have been seeking solutions to address their treaty commitments for information technology accessibility for people with disabilities.


"The ISO/IEC imprimatur increases the avenues for adoption of W3C technology and guidelines," noted Judy Brewer, Director of the Web Accessibility Initiative at W3C. "In some countries, policies require that nationally adopted technical standards must be ISO/IEC. Formal approval by JTC 1 of WCAG 2.0 will increase deployment, reduce fragmentation, and provide all users with greater interoperability on the web."


WCAG 2.0 was first submitted to the ISO/IEC JTC 1 process for Publicly Available Specifications (PAS) in October 2011. W3C has been an approved JTC 1 PAS Submitter since November 2010, and is one of nine organizations that are currently approved. To learn more about W3C and the ISO/IEC JTC1 PAS Submission process, see the W3C PAS FAQ and the JTC 1 website.


WCAG 2.0 is a stable standard with extensive supporting resources


As an ISO/IEC JTC 1 Standard, WCAG 2.0 is now also available from ISO/IEC, while it remains a stable international W3C standard with extensive supporting resources. JTC 1 recognition neither changes nor supercedes the existing standard, which remains freely available from the W3C website along with multiple W3C authorized translations of WCAG 2.0.


W3C provides a number of supporting resources for managers, developers and policy-makers, in addition to the WCAG 2.0 standard, including WCAG 2.0 Overview, WCAG 2.0 at a Glance, How to Meet WCAG 2.0: A Customizable Quick Reference, Techniques for WCAG 2.0, and Understanding WCAG 2.0.


About the World Wide Web Consortium


The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) is an international consortium where Member organizations, a full-time staff, and the public work together to develop Web standards. W3C primarily pursues its mission through the creation of Web standards and guidelines designed to ensure long-term growth for the Web. Over 375 organizations are Members of the Consortium. W3C is jointly run by the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (MIT CSAIL) in the USA, the European Research Consortium for Informatics and Mathematics (ERCIM) headquartered in France and Keio University in Japan, and has additional Offices worldwide. For more information see http://www.w3.org/


About the Web Accessibility Initiative


W3C's Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) works with organizations around the world to make the Web more accessible for people with disabilities and older users. WAI pursues accessibility of the Web by ensuring that Web technologies support accessibility; developing guidelines for Web content, browsers and media players, and authoring tools; developing resources to support improved evaluation tools; developing resources for education and outreach; and coordinating with research and development efforts that can affect future accessibility of the Web. WAI is supported in part by the U.S. Department of Education's National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR), the European Commission's Information Society Technologies Programme, HP and IBM. For more information see http://www.w3.org/WAI/


About JTC 1

The joint technical committee of ISO (International Organization for Standardization) and IEC (International Electrotechnical Commission), ISO/IEC JTC 1, Information technology, is the place where the basic building blocks of new technologies are defined and where the foundations of important ICT infrastructures are laid. With more than 2,400 standards and related documents developed by over 2,000 national body experts from around the world, ISO/IEC JTC 1 brings innovative solutions and best practice to the marketplace.

About ISO


ISO is the world’s largest developer and publisher of International Standards. ISO is a network of the national standards institutes of some 164 countries as of July 2012. More than 100 of ISO’s members are from developing countries. ISO has more than 18600 International Standards in its currents portfolio. ISO’s work programme ranges from standards for traditional activities, such as agriculture and construction, through mechanical engineering, manufacturing and distribution, to transport, medical devices, the environment, safety, information and communication technologies, and to standards for good practices and for services.

About IEC


The IEC (International Electrotechnical Commission) is the world's leading organization that prepares and publishes International Standards for all electrical, electronic and related technologies – collectively known as "electrotechnology." IEC International Standards cover a vast range of technologies from power generation, transmission and distribution to home appliances and office equipment, semiconductors, fibre optics, batteries, nanotechnologies, solar energy and marine energy converters, to mention just a few. Wherever you find electricity and electronics, you will find the IEC supporting safety and performance, the environment, electrical energy efficiency and renewable energies. The IEC also manages Conformity Assessment Systems that certify that equipment, systems or components conform to its International Standards. www.iec.ch

Media Contacts


Ian Jacobs, <ij@w3.org>, +1.718.260.9447

Roger Frost <frost@iso.org>

Location: 
Pretoria,
South Africa
Categories
Category: 
Living with sight loss latest news
Landing page
Audience group: 
Members
Display
rotation: 
Remove from Home page rotation block
front page: 
Remove from Home page article blocks
Section pages: 
Add to featured articles
what can you do: 
Remove from "What you can do" list
other media: 
Add to "Other media" list

Understanding diabetes

Content
Image: 
Picture of flower obscured by black patches
Content: 

Diabetes is a dangerous illness, which can cause irreversible damage to your eyes and can lead to blindness if not treated in time. There’s no cure for diabetes, but keeping an ideal body weight and an active lifestyle may prevent Type 2 diabetes.

Remember, your vision is irreplaceable – protect it and try to prevent complications by visiting your health care provider or diabetes educator at least four times a year.
 

Location: 
Pretoria,
South Africa
Categories
Category: 
Diabetic retinopothy
Blindness prevention
Living with sight loss latest news
Audience group: 
Members
Low or lost vision
Display
rotation: 
Remove from Home page rotation block
front page: 
Remove from Home page article blocks
Section pages: 
Add to featured articles
what can you do: 
Remove from "What you can do" list
other media: 
Add to "Other media" list

Blind commuter challenges

Content
Image: 
Photo of a person's legs - walking with a white cane
Content: 

 Council addresses challenges blind commuters face in Johannesburg

The South African National Council for the Blind, together with some of our member organisations and Mr Zain Bulbulia, the Director of Special Programmes (Disability rights), were invited by The MEC for Community Safety, Ms Nonhlanhla Faith to discuss road safety issues for visually impaired people. Representatives from COSATU were also present.

The purpose of the well-attended meeting was to forge a relationship with the visually impaired community to understand and address their safety needs, particularly road safety challenges and also to integrate and align issues of disabilities in the departmental programmes. The topic of inclusivity and sensitisation in the workplace, regarding visual impairments and the employment of visually impaired persons, were also discussed. SA National Council for the Blind’s CEO Mr Jace Nair said that government was not adequately meeting its own set targets for employing persons with disabilities.

The meeting was held at the Sci-Bono Discovery Centre in Newtown which houses the SA National Council for the Blind’s Dialogue in the Dark exhibition. The tour guides of the exhibition are blind and have great difficulty in accessing safe routes to get to work due to a lack of infrastructure and understanding around the challenges of blindness.

Location: 
Johannesburg,
South Africa
Categories
Category: 
Living with sight loss latest news
About us latest news
Audience group: 
Press
Members
Job seekers
Display
rotation: 
Remove from Home page rotation block
front page: 
Remove from Home page article blocks
Section pages: 
Remove from featured articles
what can you do: 
Remove from "What you can do" list
other media: 
Remove from "Other media" list

Helen Keller: her life and wisdom in brief

Content
Image: 
A photo of Helen Keller writing a quote
Content: 

List of facts on Helen Keller:

  • June 27, 1880 Helen Keller is born in Tuscumbia, Alabama. Her father's name is Captain Arthur Henley Keller and her mother is Kate Adams Keller.
  • February 1882 After being struck by illness, Helen loses both her sight and hearing. No one is ever sure exactly what disease she had, but some people think it was scarlet fever.
  • March 3, 1887 Anne Sullivan comes to the Keller home and begins teaching Helen letters by signing into her hand ("manual sign language").
  • April 5, 1887 Anne makes the "miracle" breakthrough, teaching Helen that everything has a name by spelling W-A-T-E-R into Helen's hand as water flows over her palm.
  • Fall 1889 Helen goes to Perkins Institution for the Blind in Boston, her first formal education.
  • September 1900 Helen becomes a member of the freshmen class of 1904 at Radcliffe College.
  • 1902 With the help of an editor, Helen writes The Story of My Life.
  • June 28, 1904 Helen becomes the first deaf-blind individual to earn a college degree, graduating with honors from Radcliffe.
  • Spring 1909 Helen joins the Suffragist movement, demanding the right to vote for women.
  • October 1924 Helen and Anne begin their work with the American Foundation for the Blind.
  • April 1930 Helen, Anne, and Polly Thompson travel abroad for the first time, visiting Scotland, Ireland, and England for over six months. This trip is only the beginning of Helen's travels overseas - she would eventually visit 39 countries!
  • October 1936 Anne Sullivan Macy dies.
  • January 1943 Helen visits blind, deaf, and disabled soldiers of World War II in military hospitals around the country.
  • September 1964 President Lyndon Johnson gives Helen the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor.
  • June 1, 1968 Helen Keller dies in her sleep.

Quotations:

  • The chief handicap of the blind is not blindness, but the attitude of seeing people towards them.
  • The most beautiful world is always entered through imagination.
  • Faith is a mockery if it does not teach us that we can build a more complete and beautiful world.
  • The best and most beautiful things in the world cannot be seen or even touched. They must be felt with the heart.
  • The only thing worse than being blind is having sight but no vision.
  • We are never really happy until we try to brighten the lives of others.
Location: 
Pretoria,
South Africa
Categories
Category: 
Living with sight loss latest news
Audience group: 
Members
Low or lost vision
Display
rotation: 
Remove from Home page rotation block
front page: 
Remove from Home page article blocks
Section pages: 
Remove from featured articles
what can you do: 
Remove from "What you can do" list
other media: 
Remove from "Other media" list
Syndicate content